Puppy Checklist

Here are some of the things you might need before bringing your puppy home:

--A kennel or dog bed if you do not want to kennel train. Kennels should be at least the LARGE size.

--Bedding for inside kennel. Old towels, or a blanket or a few cheap bath rugs (easy to throw in the wash and clean! Dogs love them!)

--Blanket or sheet to put over kennel--helps them feel more secure.

--Next size collar. We send them to you with a small 10-14 inch collar. 

--Leash.

--ID tags for collar.

--Food and water bowls.

--Puppy food! We use Kirkland's Nature's Domain Grain-free Salmon and Sweet Potato.Its best to have this on hand, and if you plan on switching to another food, mix this kibble with the new so that its a TRANSITION, not an abrupt switch. It is an all stages food, which means its safe for puppies into adulthood. 

--Grain-free puppy treats. AVOID RAWHIDE!

--Toys and chews. Great to divert your dog with when you find them chewing on the wrong thing.

--Brush! 

--Pet Stain and Odor Removal Spray.  Because accidents happen. Helps remove odors so that your puppy does not think your rug is the bathroom spot!

Action Steps

Here are some steps to take in order to get ready for your new friend!

--Set up vet appointment. We require that you take your puppy to your vet within 48 hours of getting him/her and have a check up. Remember to bring the Canine Medical Records we send with your puppy. Consult your vet to find out when the next set of booster shots should be so that your dog has full immunity.

--Puppy Proof your home! Remove anything breakable or chewable within puppy's reach. Items to consider: electric cords (phone or computer chargers), shoes, nice pillows or blankets, fancy rugs, etc.  Not all puppies chew a lot, but many do.

--Designate a spot within your home that will be the puppy's area. A place with wood or tile flooring is best til they are trained. Make sure area is warm, but not too warm. Our puppies are acclimated to high mountain days and nights. If you have a yard, make sure fencing is secure and all the little holes and gaps are filled. 

The first few days...

The first few days can be stressful for a Labradoodle puppy. He has just left his mama, littermates, familiar surroundings and routines.  Your puppy might whine a lot, shiver, not eat, be timid or follow you everywhere! Most of these things are quite common for a young puppy who is in transition. Make your buddy as comfortable as possible, ensure he has a quiet place which is his--away from children who can be overwhelming, or other pets. Talk in a soft, reassuring voice, and handle gently. Give them plenty of time to sleep. 

Unless they are especially dominant, most puppies will be nervous and timid for the first few days. They will think of you as their new mother and may follow you around the house. This is also quite natural, but after a few days, start to leave your puppy for a few minutes at a time, gradually building up to the period away. If you are never parted, he may develop separation anxiety when you do have to leave.

It can be a good idea to let the puppy sleep in your room the first few nites--bring their kennel or bed in, and plan on some interrupted sleep! Let them out at least once or twice during the night to use the bathroom.  

The strongest bonding period for a puppy is between eight and 12 weeks of age. The most important factors in bonding with your dog are TIME and PATIENCE. Spend the time to love and train your Labradoodle and you will have a loyal friend till the end!

***NOTE: You might be anxious to get your dog outside, to take on a walk, or to go play in the park. Please wait to do this! REMEMBER THAT YOUR PUPPY WILL NOT HAVE FULL IMMUNITY TIL THE 3rd ROUND OF SHOTS. PLEASE KEEP HIM/HER AT HOME AND AWAY FROM PLACES THAT MIGHT OF HAD UNVACCINATED DOGS I.E LOCAL PARKS, LOCAL PAVEMENTS!

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